New York Child Custody and Visitation Agreements – Think About Traveling with Children

Rincker Law Family/Matrimonial Law Leave a Comment

The Courts have found travel to be in the best interest of the child. Consequently, a parent should not unreasonably withhold consent for the child to travel with the other parent. If the non-traveling parent unreasonably withholds consent then the court can override the non-traveling parent’s objection to the travel.  See Matter of Arroyo v. Agosta, 2010 NY Slip Op …

Share this Article

New York Child Custody and Visitation Law: What About Supervised Visitation?

Rincker Law Family/Matrimonial Law Leave a Comment

The New York Court of Appeals has held that absent any threat to the child’s wellbeing, those people who have visitation rights have the right to unsupervised visitation with his or her child.  Weiss v. Weiss, 52 N.Y.2d 170 (1981); Nancy M. v. Brian M., 227 A.D.2d 404 (1996); Twersky v. Twersky, 103 A.D.2d 775 (1984). For the court to …

Share this Article

Child Custody and Visitation Law: Getting a Parenting Plan for School Breaks and Summer Vacation

Rincker Law Family/Matrimonial Law Leave a Comment

School Breaks Schools in New York typically have four (4) school breaks:  Thanksgiving/Fall Break, Christmas/Winter Break, President’s Day/Mid-Winter Break, and Easter/Spring Break.  When drafting a parenting plan, parents should be cognizant on what was agreed to with the holiday schedule.  Here is an example schedule (for illustrative purposes): School Break Time Even Years Odd Years Mid-Winter Recess (President’s Day Week) …

Share this Article

Child Custody and Visitation: Getting a Holiday Schedule in Place

Rincker Law Family/Matrimonial Law Leave a Comment

After deciding the “basic parenting time schedule”, parents should then decide how they want to handle holidays. Holidays include the following: School holidays/ National holidays (e.g., Columbus Day, Memorial Day) Religious holidays (e.g., Easter) Other holidays (e.g., Halloween) Birthdays (parents and children) Father’s Day and Mother’s Day Parents should make a list of all applicable holidays in which the parents …

Share this Article

Child Custody and Visitation: Getting the Basic Parenting Schedule in Place

Rincker Law Family/Matrimonial Law Leave a Comment

Parents should decide on a “basic parenting time schedule” that the parents will conduct in a regular week.  Parents should consider what is reasonable taking into consideration the location of the parent’s home, the parent’s schedule and the child’s schedule. If the parents do not live near each other, the parenting schedule deviates from regular short-term access such as every …

Share this Article

Additional Considerations with Child Custody and Visitation Agreements – Think About Communication

Rincker Law Family/Matrimonial Law Leave a Comment

Information Sharing Most parenting plans include a provision requiring the parents to share information about the child(ren) with such information as: medical records psychological records law enforcement records school report cards school progress reports school event calendar (e.g., school play, parent-teacher conferences) extra-curricular activities calendar (e.g., baseball game schedule or dance recitals). Some parents decide to keep a shared calendar …

Share this Article

Change in Guidelines for Calculating Temporary Maintenance in New York

Rincker Law Family/Matrimonial Law Leave a Comment

On September 25, 2015, New York governor, Andrew Cuomo, signed into effect legislation that has changed guidelines set for determining temporary spousal support. These guidelines for temporary maintenance go into effect October 26, 2015. One of the major changes under the new bill is the reduction in the income cap from $543,000 to $175,000. Additionally, starting on January 31, 2016 …

Share this Article

The New Maintenance Rules for Post-Divorce Maintenance

Rincker Law Family/Matrimonial Law Leave a Comment

In late September, new maintenance legislation was signed into law in New York. The new bill changes the guidelines for calculating post-divorce maintenance. The law goes into effect January 25, 2016. Similar to the temporary maintenance guidelines, the income cap for post-divorce maintenance is also $175,000. Additionally, the court makes the determination of which formula to use based on which …

Share this Article

NY Family Law: Vocational Experts

Rincker Law Family/Matrimonial Law Leave a Comment

Imputation of income to determine spousal and child support can be complicated and a vocational expert may be of help in evaluating the various factors involved in this process. A vocational expert (“VE”) is an authority in the areas of vocational rehabilitation, vocational and earning capacity, loss of earnings, cost of replacement of labor and lost ability/time in performing household …

Share this Article

NY Family Law: Imputing Income

Rincker Law Family/Matrimonial Law 2 Comments

The most common issues that arise in a divorce proceeding are financial ones and how to determine awards of child support and spousal maintenance.  Income is relevant to determining both of these awards. “In determining a party’s maintenance or child support obligation, a court need not rely upon the party’s own account of his or her finances, but may impute …

Share this Article

New York Family Law: Relocation of Non-Custodial Parent

Rincker Law Family/Matrimonial Law, Uncategorized 6 Comments

  A client recently asked me:  what happens when the non-custodial parent wishes to relocate outside of New York City greater area? She was the custodial parent in this case. Unlike with a custodial parent wishing to relocate, the law does not require the non-custodial parent to seek permission by the court, absent a separation agreement by the parties saying otherwise. …

Share this Article

New York Divorce Law: The Ground of Cruel and Inhuman Treatment

Rincker Law Family/Matrimonial Law 2 Comments

Cruel and Inhuman Treatment is one grounds for divorce in New York. To plead this ground in a complaint for divorce, you must establish that the course of conduct is harmful to your physical or mental health making cohabitation unsafe or improper. In other words, you must show more than mere incompatibility and the misconduct must be serious, not trivial. …

Share this Article